(Un)Professionalism in the workplace


We all have to deal with irate coworkers, rude, obnoxious…ill-mannered for 8 hours plus a day. We see these people more than we see our own family and friends!!

Tell me, HOW is it that some of these individuals were able to land a job? They go around intimidating others, using foul language and whatnot.  Perplexes me to the hilt!

And it’s management’s fault to allow this type of behavior to continue.

Is there fear some type of discrimination suit will follow? And why is that? If you are able to document such unsavory behavior at the onset with time, dates, individuals involved, counseling statements (get the picture) there SHOULD be a way to rectify the situation.

Just seems to me from what I’ve heard and seen by others that people are afraid to call others to the carpet (so to speak) and get to the bottom of such nonsense. I personally have no time to deal with childish foolishness. Whatever personal problems you have outside of the agency KEEP THEM THERE!

If you hate your job that much FIND SOMETHING ELSE!

Trust me, there are hundreds of individuals who would more than readily take over your position and do an even BETTER job if they are just given the chance!

According to USATODAY, there are 5 common unprofessional workplace behaviors we need to be aware of:

1. Your wild and crazy night

So last night you went out and had the time of your life. You and a group of a dozen of your friends went out on the town, went to all the best bars and night clubs, and you met the most amazing girl (or guy.) You woke up at your friend’s house just in time for work, barely able to remember what happened for the latter half of the evening.

That’s your business. But it’s probably not something you should share with the rest of the office. Sure, it’s great to share some superfluous information about yourself with your colleagues — maybe tell them about your obsession with the TV show America’s Next Top Model. But talking about drinking or a crazy night out with co-workers may be asking for trouble, and it’s best to leave that out of the office.

2. Mr. or Ms. Defensive

In business, not every comment directed your way is going to be positive. Constructive criticism is vitally necessary for any office to run smoothly. Having too thin of a skin, and being unable to handle any type of criticism is unprofessional, but it’s often viewed more as a personality trait than a behavior. “Oh, Joe is just really sensitive about his work” or “Jane really does her best, but she gets upset when someone thinks her work is lacking.”

Why? Aside from the sheer fact that we don’t want to hurt other people’s feelings, Field Law discusses the changing dynamics of the healthcare system and an employee’s need to maintain a currency of professional knowledge. Although the publication refers specifically to the healthcare system, this would really apply in any business system. When employees don’t maintain knowledge in their field, we hear those “this is how we did it when I was trained 10 years ago” responses. Failure to maintain such current knowledge, or seek assistance where needed, may result in a level of insecurity or defensiveness on the part of an employee.

3. Being non-responsive

What do you do when you don’t like the contents of an email? What if it warrants a reply? Ignore it? Ignoring communications is yet another unprofessional behavior. Just about everyone is busy (not just you), and ignoring a problem will not make it go away.

If you make a commitment to a customer, subordinate, your boss, or a co-worker, do you keep that promise? Breaking promises or making promises that you cannot keep falls under this category as well. Be direct and straightforward.

4. Laziness

No one is at 100% all of the time, and you’re going to have those days where you only have about 75% of your energy available for the day. However, the important thing is to give your best every day, no matter what, even if your best is a little tired on Mondays. “If you collect 100 percent of your paycheck, you owe 100 percent work effort,” reads a Compete Outside the Box publication.

Shamming is the act of intentionally avoiding work. Many people place more effort into shamming than they would have to place into simply doing their jobs correctly. For instance, say a cashier has to run back and forth between sitting down in the break room and his register every time a customer comes into the line. He makes 20 trips back and forth, just to get away from his line for a combined total of 12 minutes, while his boss is in the back of the store, unable to see that he’s “shamming.” If the cashier just stayed at his register, he could have placed much less effort into simply standing there waiting for customers.

5. He said, she said

Gossip is a notoriously problematic concern within the workplace. Jane and Joe were talking behind Sue’s back. “She’s so lazy, why did she get the promotion,” one coworker may say about another Or: “Did you hear his wife left him?” the office big mouth says to a group of workers. This type of behavior is not only unprofessional, it causes conflicts and deters collaborative efforts among teams.

Along the same lines, blaming others for your mistakes is also unprofessional. “I wanted to do it the right way, but Joe told me that it was supposed to be done this way.” Taking responsibility for yourself and your actions is a mark of a professional.

(source)


 

Passive-aggressiveness seems to be a common trait.  If an individual doesn’t like your answer, or doesn’t like you…..don’t expect any action, any time soon. And I group that with laziness.  Don’t get me started on THAT one!   😦

I also hear about a lot of office gossip and I for one refuse to partake.  Am here to work, not make someone else’s life miserable.

And don’t get me started on the very personal conversations I’ve overheard through the years. Keep that stuff to yourself or outside of the office.

The solution is really quite simple…clean up your act or leave.

 

Not that difficult.

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